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ICKipedia Theatre
ICKipedia Theatre

Episode 1 · 2 years ago

1 — MacBADth & beth

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

We begin our journey into The Western Canon™ with a classic, lauded by scholars and audiences alike as perhaps one of the best pieces of theatre in existence, Shakespeare's Macbeth. Except we've made it terrible in the best way. This episode features excerpts from playwright Alex Lin's "beth," an adaptation of Macbeth which takes place in a high-powered STEM high school where our eponymous heroine (and everyone she knows) works toward her ultimate goal: the Intel Science and Engineering Fair's $75,000 grand prize. 

"MacBADth"

adapted by Lauren D'Errico, directed by Brandy N. Carie

featuring performances by Alec Seymour, Amara Pedroso Saquel, Ben Barnett, Brittany Liu, Carol Jeong, Jasmine Thomas, Jazmine Cornielle, Jillian Sun, and Phoebe Holden

"beth"

written by Alex Lin, directed by Cara Hinh

featuring performances by Brittany Liu (Beth), Surasree Das (Bea), Noah Keyishian (Danny), and Phoebe Holden, Carol Jeong, and Jillian Sun (Weird Sisters 1, 2, & 3)

Okay, do we want to begin it by being like hi, I'm Joshua Brown, and you being like I'm Lauren Dreko, and then we can be like and this is Ikybenia theater. Yeah, I was gonna say like we're going to start it with like this is the first episode of welcome, welcome baby, be opos to high brown is now Brown, and between them is middle ground, describing culture that is neither hind one of the opposite of good theater is bad theater, and between them the Zikipedia. Okay, cool, Hey, welcome baby. Hey, welcome baby, baby, welcome to the Bod Gass Baby. Oh, I'm so sorry, you have to listen to this later. It's fine because I was recording all of the a baby, Oh, me too. It's gonna go in. Oh my God, thank God. Yeah, okay, hi, hello, and welcome to iikipedia theater podcasts first pilot episode. This is the first episode. This is the first one. I'm Joshua Brown and I'm Lauren Dur Ego, and we finally made it the first episode of Achy. It's been so many months. Oh my God. This idea in quarantine where we were like hey, what if we made bad plays out of wikipedia plot summaries. And here we are, I know, and it's so funny that this just exists now independent of all those months we did to make it. But now we're here and this is the first episode. Yeah, and it's the first episode and it's the only episode so far. So that's kind of cool, which makes it even better. We love to see that. Hell, we love to see we love to see, no comparison. We love to not see it because it's audio. We love to hear it. Imagine what we look like with our beautiful buttery voices, I know are beautiful. Are Beautiful, full heads of hair, our voices, view, our BANGS, our banks, they're all here for the first episode of Wikipedia. This is the Macbeth episode Beeth Podcast, where we talked about mcbeth. Only we love exhausted that pretty quickly, I think. Oh, I would say hello, here's Macbeth, and then and then that would be the end. That's it, because here's the thing. We haven't read mcbeth. No, I think the last time I read Macbeth was probably my sophomore year of high school, which would be like two thousand and ten. What about you? Mine was so I read two Shakespeare's in my sophomore year high school. The first one was a fellow and I when we read it out loud, I played IAGO and it was great because I love being evil. I'm a very terrible actor and my limited range only covers like comic relief, the clinically insane and like just evil, only evil. So Yago was great, your evil. Yeah, that's his defining character trait. And do you remember anything about reading mcbeth? Macbeth? Know what? Do you remember anything about reading mcbeth? I never read Macbeth and never, not once. I don't know anything about it except that everyone's like, Lady Macbeth is so evil and so cool and she's a femme fatale, and I'm like great, love that you don't know anything. This is an interesting start for this whole podcast because I don't remember reading Macbeth either at all and ever, not once. Yeah, and it was interesting. Which one is Macbeth? Macbeth is a Scottish play. No, which which Disney movie is Macbeth? Oh, thinking, yeah, really, no, that's hamlet. I like. Yeah, so I'm totally off base, but that was a really exciting place to start for me because I was, you know, learning as I went and sort of I feel like Shakespeare exists in my mind of like I'm aware of all the pieces of like Oh, that's from a Shakespeare play, but I just don't know how to fit the puzzle together because I'm like, Oh, yeah, like you know, like the skull, that must be from like the one that's she's all that or whatever, and that's not even the movie that it is. I think. You know, she's the man. She's the man. She's the man. And here's the thing about she's the man. I was just thinking about that while you were saying that, because in junior year of school in high school, we read twelve night and we were and I was like, you know, I was like big gay in a very tiny pond and I was like wait, this is gay. And then we watch and Amanda Buying. We watched a Mana bynes and that was like such a complete culture shock for me because I was like wait, I was really into my like dead white men phase of literature where I was like lusting over the Pulitzer Prize. Still am, but I was like Oh,...

...fine, art and literary writing like or what is it? Literary fiction? But we watched she's man and I was like, this is Bombas fuck that they made Shakespeare, but it's Amanda Buying. Yeah, isn't that lovely? Yeah, yet so I'm sure it see this. This has nothing to do with make that, but it's all important because this big melting pot of our relationship to the cannon has what number one we will definitely get more into as episodes progress in this podcast, but number two has brought us to this point of the way that we perceive the classics and the way that we might low key hate the classics a little bit, maybe looking a little bit, maybe hike. She hate Shakespeare, but that's okay, I'm ready to say it on episode one. Well, here's the thing, sisters and brothers and brethren and pizzas, that we when we say that we hate Shakespeare, we hate how Shakespeare is sort of taking up all the air in the room in terms of the American theater and in terms of how safe classical theater is to produce and all of the things that that means for the contemporary theater makers is that there are far more resources devoted to things that have already been said. Then two things that could be said or things that should be said. So if you're a shakespeare scholar or a director who loves Shakespeare, or writer who writes in the Shakespeare in style, or an actor whose big thing is that you love Shakespeare and you've done all the plays, we love you and that's great and we I have a thing where I truly stand and love and admire people who do things that I can't and those are lots of things that I can't do. So let me just say that when we say we hate Shakespeare, we're truly honoring all of the work that you do. Just from our end. We don't. I've not paid to see s Shakespeare in my life except for she's the man. Yeah, I just haven't. I don't know. In the same way that I feel that I'm having my middle school musical theater phase now, maybe I'll have my middle school or like early high school shakespeare phase in like fifteen years. Yeah, you know, I just haven't totally gotten on the train yet. I've enjoyed a lot of shakespeare productions, but I'm not on the train. Can you imagine, just like talking to Shakespeare, feeling probably would have been a sure he would have been a big dick but also like really silly and funny. I feel like it would have liked funny but also like man energy, also like definitely talk over you in the conversation. You know. Yeah, definitely. If Shakespeare were alive today, he would be a white dude filmmaker making black and white movies about alcoholism and being really deep and loving hemingway and thinking he's really cool. But he wouldn't be really cool because he'd be Shakespeare in two thousand and twenty and no one's cool in two thousand and twenty except us. Yeah, like on your like hang out, he would have been like, oh, like, I'll pay for your bowl of like stew when we go to like the town square together. But then like suddenly, like he's out of shillings and like you only brought enough shillings for you, so you have to like split the soup and it's like not that good. Also, like there's rats in the streets, everyone has your fucking cob on a play, a cockney accident, and you're probably like your teeth are falling out and you're not having a good time, nor a good day. And Shakespeare's just like a salary love. We're not historical scholars don't write us. Okay, so let's talk about like bad which is our first for a in this hole achy thing. And by acky thing I mean taking wikipedia pages and making them into performance texts, because we're artists, because big old a big old TM. After that. Yeah, the only art we care about, I think, US making, is weird and or patchwork. Are In that way one hundred percent. So we were really excited about this and it was fun and strange, like, I feel like for me, who did the writing of this one specifically, and also for Josh, who has done some writing of some other ones, who can offer his insight on the whole, on the whole ordeal of writing these. I feel like the first draft, quote unquote, came out really quickly, but then it sort of took like a little finessing to like make it into a play and make it makes sense specifically for an audio format, and also not make it good, which was my favorite part. There's something so specific...

...about the absolute stress of always having to vet your ideas and say, okay, is this a good idea or a bad, booby Cocka idea? And based on that initial judgment, you say like does this deserve to exist? And here's the thing, Mama, that is many of us. If any of our parents had that same thought about us, many of us would not exist because they've been like no, that would be a bad idea. I don't want that feature film in my life and I don't want credits for it. But thing, credit role for that BECA's the thing. Sometimes you have to just make art and, especially when art is your job, you have to find ways to make art in a low stakes, low stress situation, because theater is really stressful and music is really stressful and being alive is really stressful. So saying I'm going to make bad art, and you know, bad, bad, arn't on purpose. Yeah, and not meaning that as in like it's, you know, unentertaining or in bad faith, but that it's just reduced to such a specific elemental stage, a wikipedia plot summary. Yeah, and then and limiting ourselves to just that as the constraints, you know. Yeah, and then you make it. And then their actual production constraints of like, okay, cool. In the wikipedia plot summary it just says, you know, they go to Scotland. But then in an audio format, as a sound designer and a writer, I'm like, wait, what does that sound like. What is the actual experience of that moment? And it becomes a lot harder and you have to do a lot of minute edits to the script to make sure that it actually makes sense. So part first away. Yeah, so let's listen to it and maybe and maybe this will be more memorable for you listener. Then the realm death, which it definitely is for me. We listen to the real mcbeth and then come back and listen to this and say, wow, I feel very refreshed by this contemporary take. Think on Shakespeare's Macbeth. Let's listen. Who should our next meeting being? Should our next meeting be with mcbeth? Yes, with Nickbeth, so we've decided. Then he's ducking. Yes, your general, who is the fate of clubs as well, was your kinsman and bank will have defeated the allied forces of Norway and Ireland, who were traitorously led by mcdonwald and the thing of gold or. I praise him for his bravery and his prowess in battle. King Duncan, I've been wounded. How about this weather, Banquoll? How about it? How about our victory and war, mcbeth? How about it? All this talking and we've wandered onto this heath. Hello, hello, are three witches, and we will tell you our prophecies. For Are you what prophecies? All have vein of call, he'll thing of cold or Oh Hal, you will be king hereafter stunned. What about my fortunes? You will be less than Macbeth, but yet here than him. You will be less successful than the death, but yet more successful than who will father a line of Kings, but you will not be all. Wonder what these pronouncements could possibly mean. That was a paradox. I wonder what it means. The witches have disappeared and here's say, Ross Macbeth, I'm here to bestow on you a title than of Caud or. That was the first prophecy, and now it's been fulfilled. I was skeptical before, but now I'm beginning to feel like I have ambition to be king. Welcome, I applaud you both for your success in battle and, Macbeth, I declare that I will be spinning the night out of your castle in Inverness. Also, I have named my son Malcolm and as my air it is i the Messenger, here to deliver your message. Send a message ahead to my wife, Lady Macbeth, about the witches who told me their prophecy that I will eventually be king, of which I am still currently skeptical. She has...

...at my castle in inverness. Lady Macbeth, it is I your husband's messenger, here to deliver a message to you. I have received his message. I've arrived at inverness. Macbeth, I don't share your skepticism regarding the prophecies from the witches. I wish that you would kill Duncan so that you will take the throne. MMM, I don't think I should kill Duncan. Know you should kill Duncan. The fact that you don't want to kill Duncan makes me fundamentally challenge your manhood. Now I am convinced to kill Duncan and I plan to do it to night. The plan is that we will get Duncan's to chambermaids drunk in the night and then, in the morning, blame them for the murder. They will have no defense because, since they will have been drunk, they won't remember anything from the night. HMM, yes, that's the plan me may May Duncan is sleeping, so now I have the opportunity here to stab him. I am still going to stab him right now, even though I am still feeling skeptical about the prophecies in general, and I did hallucinate a bloody dagger. Oh God, the fact that I have just killed Duncan has me shaken up. I'm taking charge of the rest of this plan. In accordance with the second step of our plan, I've placed the bloody dagger with the sleeping servants. We've arrived at inverness. Mcduff, yes, we have Lennox. The gate is open. Thank you, porter for opening the gate. Hello, Lennox and mcduff. This way is King Duncan's that's King Duncan's body. He's been stamped we is God. Why'd you kill the guards? I did so because I am in such a fit of rage because the guards killed King Duncan. I am Malcolm. I am fleeing into England because I fear whoever wanted to kill King Duncan must also desire the demise of his son too. I am Donald Baine. I am fleeing to Ireland because I fear whoever wanted to kill King Duncan must also desire the demise of his son too. Both sons of King Duncan are now suspects because they have fled the country. As a kingsman of King Duncan, Macbeth has now assumed the throne as the new king of Scotland. I Bank will feel skeptical of Macbeth as King, and the witch is said in their prophecies that my descendants would be the ones to inherit the throne. Not only am I skeptical of Macbeth, I'm suspicious of him too. The witches said in their prophecies that I would be king, but the witch is also said that Banquo's descendants would inherit the throne too. So I'm feeling uneasy about the state of my kingship. I invited banquet to a royal banquet and I was surprised to find out that both he and his son fleance will be riding out to attend, because I really only invited Banquo. I fear that Banquo is becoming suspicious of me. Murderers, we are the murders, murderers. I've hired you two outs to find and killed Banquo and fleance. Later I will hire and send a third murderer. I'm the third murderer. I've hired a third murderer. Sometime has passed, but I have also hired to kill banquet when fla once before they arrive, we did kill bank wall what fla once fled from the scene. I am furious. As long as any of Banko's airs are alive, my power is not secure. Lords and Lady Macbeth, I invite you all to a night full of drinking and merriment, drinking. The ghost of Banquo was here in my chair at this banquet. That outburst was startling, that chairs empty. I am desperate for you to understand that Macbeth is actually just afflicted with a harmless malady that will be familiar to us all. The ghost of Banquo was here again, in my chair, again at this banquet. Again, Lord's please leave. We will do so. I am disturbed...

...and I'm visiting you three whiches so that you will clarify your prophecies and reveal the truth to men. apparitions that are horrible, but they will offer further prediction, not for ultimately put your fear about the original prophecies to rest. The first aborisons this conjured head. The second parishion is this bloody child. The third apparission is a crown child holding a tree. You will be said, till Great Burnham Wood comes to Dunson a hill. I'm relieved because I know that all men are born from women and that forest don't move. Will any of Banqueos sons ever rule Scotland? Have conjured a procession of Eight crowned kings. All eight of these kings look similarly to banquell. The eighth king at the end of the procession has a mirror. The Mirror is reflecting even more kings. Reflections of the Kings also are similar in appearance to banquee. Oh, I've realized that this apparition means that all of banquets descendants will acquire the kingship of many different countries. Now we will do our while the dads. Now we will do a wild days. We will do why? D mcduff has fled to England. She's mcduskcat hustle. I'm most cruelly order murderers to slaughter mcduff, his wife and his children. Everyone in mcduff's castle has been put to death, though he himself was not there. I am feeling racked with guilt of the crimes that Macbeth and I have committed, those crimes being killing King Duncan, framing his servants and killing his guards. Gentlewoman, lady mcbeth has been sleepwalking lately. What a strange habit for her to develop. Doctor. She seems to be in a trance. The murders of King Duncan, lady mcduff and Bang Quill fill me with deep sorrow, and I'm trying to get the stain of blood off my hands, but nothing can wash it off. I pressured Macbeth to kill Duncan, which is caused the rest of the murders. This is an ironical reversal because earlier I had claimed to Macbeth that the little water clears us all of this deed, and that has turned out to be not true in my case. It is astoonishing how lady Macbeth has descended into madness. It is such a marvel. We're in England. Mcduff, your castle is surprised. Wife and Babe Savagely slaughtered. The fact that this news has reached me at all strikes me with grief. I've ever revenged for their deaths. I, Malcolm, have successfully raised an army here in England and I plan to challenge Macbeth's forces. I will join you in that right, Malcolm, and I will lead you my army and seeward, earl of Northampton, against dunsonine castle. We, the Scottish Noble, support up this invasion. We, the Scottish Nobles, are appalled by Macbeth's tyrannical behavior. We, the Scottish nobles, are frightened by Macbeth's mired the rest behavior. I order you to cut down all of these trees around our camp and Burnham Wood carry the limbs of the tree so that our numbers are camouflage when we continue toward Macbeth's ranks at Dunsinane. I have just received the news that Lady Macbeth has killed herself, and I feel that I am sinking now into a despair that is both deep and pessimistic. She should have died hereafter there would have been a time for such a word. Tomorrow, and tomorrow and tomorrow creeps in this petty pace from day to day to the last syllable of recorded time, and all our yesterdays have lighted fools the way to dusty death, out out brief candle. Life is about a walking shadow, a poor player that struts and frets his hour upon the stage and then has...

...heard no more. It is a tale told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing. Despite my previous reflections on the brevity and meaninglessness of life, I will still fortify Dunsinane as I wait for the English army to approach for battle. I feel certain that the prophecies from the wishes will mean that I will be invincible in this battle, because all men are born of women and forest cannot move on their own. I am the Messenger and I have arrived with this message. The English army is a fancy on Dunsinane. They were shielded with tree limbs that they cut from Burnham Wood. That fulfills one of the witches three prophecies, and I am struck with fear. This battle is coming to its culmination. Macbeth, I'm here to confront you. I'm going to kill sword. I'm dying. The English forces have overwhelmed my army and my castle. But, mcduff, I have no reason to fear you, but I was from my mother's womb and timely ripped. I am not literally of woman born. This fulfills the second prophecy, and I have just realized, now too late, that I have misinterpreted the witch's prophecies. Though I am doomed, I'll continue to fight. Ha whoooo punk. The remaining prophecy is the only one left to be fulfilled. I'm going to behead you. Here is Macbeth's head. Order has been restored. My last reference sal make to lady Macbeth is that Tis fought by self and wife and hat that she took her own life. What was the method of her suicide? That is undisclosed. I am now the King of Scotland and I declare that I have benevolent intentions for the country. I invite you all to see me be crowned at scone. Okay, yeah, okay, so good. Well, that was a full experience of a Shakespeare plays. Nothing there was there was no context missing, there was no poeticism lost. I think that it all. We really got the juices flowing from that. Yeah, I think that's really the kind of language that they say when they talk about the fact that Shakespeare really sort of took the English language and really shaped it into something of his own and sort of left a mark on society forever with you. Ah, the language, such as I'm going to be head you now the poet, but the poeticism is really just like hopping off the Pade. Oh absolutely. I'm really proud of US too, because we really took one might say a bloated original text and really wrung it out so we got the good those good juices. Yeah, essence of that what that play really wanted to be into a tight sixteen minutes. I totally agree, and we really found the most essential pieces and really brought them to the forefront and just kind of left everything else that we didn't need in in the garbage pile. You know I mean, we didn't really need anything that we didn't include. I think we were really, really resourceful with digging through this rubbage pile that was the original stript and dramaturgically interpreting it into this new and exciting form. You know, when he says I'm going to kill sea word and then seward goes, like I should, several tears and seeward goes, I am dead. How would you know? Otherwise? You wouldn't he was dead if he didn't say I'm dead. You know, literally, my favorite line in any Shakespeare play of the three that I've ever read is when hamlet kills Polonius and Polonius just goes I'm slain and then slumps. That is my favorite train. Then he's slown Sloan. Yeah, honestly. But truly what it the celebration here is that we gave we gave Brandy, our lovely director, and our cast such a visage and terrible performance document with so, so little subtext and so little room for actual, like nuanced acting, and they made lemons out of lemonade and really made something that made me laugh a lot while I was working on it. Yeah, I love mcbeth. I love everything that filled...

...up macbath and I just love like that, on a technicality, I feel like I have watched me and read Macbeth and really understand everything that happens in Macbeth, you know, like the irony, when she said it's an ironical you know, turnaments. That that's the irony in the play. I understand. The irony is part of it. Now I'm back to being thirteen and I was I just want so I wasn't using spark notes at thirteen, but when I went to school in high school and I was fifteen and I was looking at spark notes so I didn't have to read. I really feel like we took what spart notes was offering and really just like took it to the next level, really just bumped it up with our friendcom wikipediacom, dotnet, dot bomb dot of so the other thing, besides our feelings about the Class Essex, that have brought us to this point today, on this afternoon, or whatever you're listening to this is our feeling is about adaptation. We love it. Yeah, which are super exciting and go super deep, and so this is an adaptation. Yeah, you know, just like really digging in, really just like, you know, like pulling the threads out and just finding what we needed to create this adaptive tas one might say we're archeologists and that this was an anthropological exercise in really determining the human condition and how it stays the same over centuries. You know, I think we're really doing important work. I dug through the dirt to find this book, Cald on our hands and mean covert in mud, dirt and bugs. But the thing that is exciting is contemporary adaptation, because what it does for contemporary writers is that it puts classical texts, or whatever you're basing your inquiry on, in conversation with current events and with sort of current sensibilities, current conceptions about the human condition, and a lot of the time gives it the sort of skeletal nature of a piece a lot more sort of like thematic depth, because often adaptations are very specific, they're very specifically situated in a time or a culture or a place, and that's exactly what we're interested in exploring in terms of curating adaptations of classic literature for this podcast. That was just so beautifully said. I was just taking it in for a SEC. Yeah, so we are really excited to, with the same energy that we're focusing on seeking out interesting classic plays by people that are dead, doing this thing, doing the same for really cool, interesting emerging a live writers. So informers, directors, art makers, pulses who have thought. Yeah, with pulses that are at like what's sixty three beats per probably have twitter like. Yeah, honestly, we're really excited. We're really excited to use this platform that we're sort of building with wood stakes ourselves to present other plays that we think are really fucking cool. And the first one was a macbeth adaptation and the title is Beth and it was written by Alex Linn and we were lucky enough to first of all know Alex. One of us, Josh, worked with Alex at Actors Theater of Louisville last year. Yeah, last year we were apprentices together in the professional training company making those connections. But we were very excited, actually really to find this play totally by accident and then sort of put it together after the fact when I read on her new play exchange profile that she worked and actors Stater of Louisville the same year Josh did, and I was like, Josh, what's what are the chances that you know Alex Lynn? And Josh said, I love Alex. well, here's the beautiful thing so about the Internet that we're using WIKIPEDIA and new play exchange and putting them basically in conversation. So the new play exchange is a beautiful database for contemporary writers to share their work, to share samples, to share full scripts, and we use that in the Surt Way, tag, not spine, not sponsored at all. Should we hate to use it also donate to wikipedia because they're really great. Yeah, I, like Lauren being a playwright and me being a Dramaturg, we use new play exchange for various reasons and the ability to filter through the scripts and the writers who were on that site is really, really exciting, and we've been able to pull so many different adaptations from that site and start to think about them and start to think about reaching out to those writers and explore relationships with living people who are telling really great stories based on...

...classical plays. Yeah, so in the ladder half of this episode we are going to be featuring some excerpts from Beth and also an interview with Alex. Yes, it's really excited. I'm really excited. It's really exciting. Podcast itself is really excited also. It's quaking in its boots. So before we get to our interview with Alex, here's a little more information about her, written by her. Alex Linn is an Asian American playwright from Bergen County, New Jersey. Her place have been workshopped with Actors Theater of Louisville's professional training company, the rude mechanicals in Richland, Washington and upcoming Miami University as an x stem kid. Alex is also a content Creator for a twenty four Film Space Media Company, supercluster, where she's written editorial articles featuring former astronaut Nicole stop, Mike Mazzi Minno and screenwriter Mark Hayman. Black Swan, Alex was recently seen as number eleven and actors theaters production of the wolves, directed by perne use of STATA BFA Nyu Tish. So I'm Alex Linn. I'm from Bergen County, New Jersey. I'm a Jersey girl through and through. That's like probably seventy five percent of my personality and other twenty five percent is being mixed Ras Asian, with specifically an Asian mom and like never getting to have like any sleepovers oh when I was a kid because I have other parents. So that's most of who I am. I'm a playwright. I also am a space journalist. I work for a twenty four s space media company, supercluster. I Love Space and science and stem and I don't know. I like wrote this kind of just to reflect on the stem high school I went to and like what that experience I guess how that affected me into my like adult life and just like the way that I have noticed myself, like, I don't know, I guess. I guess just like what kind of values it like instill did me good and bad. So, yeah, that's me. Yeah, that's really cool. It's been really exciting to see Beth take shape and to sort of be like, oh, it's kind of like a really interesting window into that experience because I, coming from a shitty high school, know nothing about like people killing each other over, oh, yeah, Opportunity. Yeah, over like grades or over like competitions or stuff that like you think is really important when you're in the moment and it's told to you that it's really important by basically everybody around you, but once you actually get to like life outside of high school, you realize, oh, that didn't that didn't really matter. I mean, like it does matter. I'm not saying like fail school, guys, but like fail school, fail school, but it's definitely not like the be all end all that people would have you believe it would. It is. Yeah, everything definitely feels like the most important thing in the world when you're like seventeen. Totally. Yeah, I missed that too. Now I'm times. I don't know what anything is like. What's important. My No, it's sleep important. Maybe sometimes, I don't know. Possibly, could you find it in your soul to give us a really quick, like one to two cent summary of Beth? So want a two seven summary? I would say Beth is about elite magnet school teens in northern New Jersey literally fighting for their lives over the Intel International Science Fair Grand Prize, seventy FIVEZERO dollars, which will basically get you into Harvard or any Ivy League that you want and you get to meet former President Obama. Yeah, and like, I mean they'd like kill each other. I mean that's that's kind of that's like the summary. And so what would you say that your relationship is to the theatrical cannon of Shakespeare? Yeah, or just like in general, just in general. Um, well, I I was really, really, really big NERD in high school. So I always really, really loved the theatrical cannon. I really like Shakespeare a lot, but I think as I got older and as I realized, Oh, like, I'm not a white person, because you like you don't feel like you're not like born realizing that you're different. I'm sure that makes a lot of sense, I kind of had to like reconcile that. You know, a lot of this cannon has been gate capped and specifically like reconstructed for white people, and it was difficult for me to reconcile that because I like Shakespeare so much...

...and I really, really, really wanted to be a part of like that community. And it's not to say that I felt like explicitly excluded, but I definitely felt that I was very much put into a box because of just like the identities I happened to be born with, and that frustrated me a lot. It made me really, really, really frustrated because it, you know, you kind of get this impression from people teaching Shakespeare. Ill, with Shakespeare, anybody can do it, all right, it's relatable to anybody. It's really only relatable to anybody if you actually if you actually make it relatable to any anybody, and you actually include everyone and you don't just keep casting based on your preconceived notions of what, I don't know, what rich or the third supposed to look like or what a macbeth is supposed to look like or supposed to act like. You know, yeah, so, yeah, yeah, and you've been able to be in like perform in a Bune of Shakespeare right. Yeah, way too much. So how was that sort of not only studying it but then actually being in it, sort of embodying and those individual productions to sort of how did that, I guess, shape or change or augment those feelings? I think being in it well actually really depends production to production in the environment you're in. I would say best case scenario. You Know Shakespeare, the language elevates you so much and I think if you really you know, if you do it, I don't want to like sound pretentious or anything, but I think, I think frankly, that people doing shakespeare can get a little pretensious in a little too caught up in like the language, in the structure. While that stuff is like important, I think the most important stuff is like the most simple things that he writes. And if you allow that stuff to really like hit you, like, I guess, just for example, a mother losing her child or somebody losing their spouse or somebody having like unrequited love and like having it never be reciprocated to them, all those very like simple ideas, I think it just shows you how emotionally intelligent he was and that's why his plays have lasted so long. It's not necessarily just because of the language. It's because, you know, these are plays about people, like people you actually like start to like them, you know, because they have so much personality, so that those experiences are awesome and they're really really cool to go through because it's like Oh, like, people really aren't that different and we haven't really changed that much over the centuries, for better, for worse, worst case scenario out I've definitely felt a little like tokeny sometimes, especially like in classical spaces or any pay spaces where we're dealing with like the theatrical cannon. I think it's something dealing with as like an actor of color. It's a little confusing sometimes because you never really know. Did I get this part because they want to like make a statement, or did I get this part because they actually think I'm the best person for this part? So sometimes, being in like those different environments, it's very uncomfortable and I guess, just like my goal as a writer is to try to eliminate any of those questions by just making plays more inclusive period, you know. Yeah, so going along with that sort of interaction and those sort of personal explorations and that weird double think of like, am I in this because I'm good? Am I in this because there's some kind of agenda behind the director's vision, like they want a cute Asian girl? Yeah, like, what does it mean for me to be here as opposed to a bunch of other people who don't have to think about that, who might just be like yeah, I'm here because I'm really good. Yeah, period, totally. I guess. What about Macbeth in particular was attention grabbing for you? As a writer, I have always really, really really liked the writing in Nickbeth. I think it's almost like the perfect revenge story, and it's like a revenge story multiple fronts. I just really love revenge stories. I've always really really liked them and I think they're kind of honestly, I kind of think most popular revenge stories, at least in some part, are drawn from Macbeth and whatever whatever other Canon mcbeth might be drawn from, because, as we know, Shakepeare did not come up with any of his own plots and when he did come up with his own plus, they were really sad, sorry, really bad. The tempest. I don't like the tempest. Sorry, it's that Oh, Shit. I hate it boring. Like I don't really care about like I understand like the emotional impact.

He's like, Oh, I'm retired from writing. This is my like goodbye everybody. I'm saying good time, but like it's like in terms of like goodbye um pieces of ore, I think the tempest would be like a zero. David boways Black Star would be a ten. Like that's that, I think, is like the scale of good like see you never place album plays express. Okay, I totally, I totally went off the rails, but yeah, I guess just like long story, Shuret, I've always really, really really liked the writing mcbeth. It's specifically like it's a very emotional play and I've always really really liked that it's emotional while also being very strategic, which I think. I don't know you you wouldn't necessarily think it as just like somebody thinking of stem very like surface level, on a very surface level sort of way. But going to a stem high school everybody is super strategic but also super emotional at the same time because their homes are going crazy. They think if they don't win this competition or they don't get into Harvard at the end of the world and at the same time they have to like, I don't know, go finish a lab in three days, like ride a lab report in three days and make sure, like you don't run out of like paper in your lab book because it all has to be carbon copied, and like you have to make sure you're like, like, I hope I'm not going to say I'd trying not to say people's names. I hope Doctor P reads this well enough for me to get a good grade, you know. So that's what dreamy to Macbeth, because I just felt like it was relatable, and I think that's what draws a lot of people to Shakespeare, even as old as those plays are. Ye, so you touched on this a little just now and also in the beginning, but so related to that, to like what is Beth about to you? For you, like in a thematic sort of way. For me, that really like came out of me. I'll started the very beginning, I think this play. Obviously I was very influenced by peerless. I hope not to the point where people are going to think I like plagiarize. I don't think so, but I'm sure somebody will get angry at me and I'm prepared for it. I love hate mail. Please it immediately. So I read peerless by j Hay Park and I as I was reading it, I was like, Oh my God, Oh my God, this is just like my school, except at the same time it wasn't. So I kind of wrote Beth in an effort to be like, this is my school and this is what we had to deal with, this is what I had to deal with, this is my friends had to deal with more than just college acceptances, because college acceptances, no doubt. We're very, very very was a very tense time, but for me going to this high school, that was almost like a constant thing, like it wasn't just college, it was also all these other competitions happening in between, and it was always like building towards college, obviously, and then building towards I don't know, I like having a great career, but it was almost like a constant sort of energy. So I just kind of wrote Beth almost like as therapy for myself to be like, okay, yeah, this did happen, this did happen to all of us. There were people like this, and this is how I coped with it. But I guess just more as I reflect more and more about the play, I think it also, for me, was about being somebody who was like, I mean, it's like a stem school. So even though I was in like the very like Arty Fartzi Academy, I still was doing a lot of stem classes and in that stem environment and I had a lot of friends in that environment and it was just kind of reflecting on the values that I adhered to, which I kind of regret now, like like how how women have to or, if emide inviting people, have to adapt adopt more masculine traits really to be accepted in stem and kind of have to act like the boys, for lack of a better term, to join the boys club. I'm doing air quotes, but nobody's seen and yeah, it just reflecting on that and how, I think in Western society we kind of understand ambition as this very masculine thing period, and you kind of in Macbeth, you kind of have the conflict between the feminine and the masculine, though not necessarily in in the ascribe genders, you would think. You know, we have lady Macbeth being the more masculine partner. Mcbeth be the more feminine. I writing. Beth wanted to,...

I guess, just explore that conflict within the self rather than having it be in two separate people, because it's definitely something I experienced while I was at high school. I definitely felt like I had to adopt more masculine, more aggressive and sometimes more like, I guess, just like cut, throw and emotionally violent sort of behaviors just to survive and just to like kind of be seen, especially as young, small and pretty small Asian, Feminine Presenting Woman in that Environment. I think a lot of why I felt like I had to perform, that I did any more, was because, in a sad way, and I'm not saying this is like like what I actually believe, but I think people saw me a certain way and we're immediately dismissive. So I definitely felt like I had to perform more. So this play was really me just like trying to figure out why, why did I feel like I have to do that? How fucked up is it? Is it is it an okay excuse to be just as like violent and ambitious, I guess, just so you feel like you can survive at the end of this play. I think I've definitely concluded no, but Um, I think it was a it was just like something I wanted to work out. So so I decided to work it out in a play. Yeah, in terms of telling this story based on sort of the framework of a piece in the western cannon, NC Beth, and sort of based on your the intersection or the interaction of your personal lived experience and this piece of Art Peer List, which sort of like brought up a little bit, was not fully like scratching the itch. Was Not exactly like the move the experience, the like Cathartic release that you were looking for. I guess, what was the experience writing, specifically an adaptation, being inspired by these works and also yourself, and was there any sort of while you were working on it, any sort of like mishmash of these things banging around in your head, or what was the experience of adaptation for you? I think this might make me sound really, really naughty, but I didn't really look at MC Beth that much. Well, just because I think it's such for most people. I would say most people know the plot, like the very basic plot, and I personally kind of didn't want to feel behold into going scene by scene by scene by scene, then making it like a perfect match. I wasn't really interested in doing that. What I really was interested by a macbeth was a struggle between the masculine and the feminine and the ambition. So those were the really like the big things I took and I kind of just like looked at the list of characters and pick the names that I liked and like rift on them and decided who I wanted to keep in the play and who I didn't want to keep in the play and also, you know, looking at the list of characters, try to think if I knew anybody in that I had like had an experience with in high school that kind of reminded me of them. So that that's pretty much as far as they went in terms of like referencing the actual, what do you call it, source text or source material? And then I kind of just knew the big things I had to do. I knew Duncan had to die, I knew banquet had to die and I knew there had to be like princes, but like they don't necessarily have to like be that important. They kind of run away into whatever, and I knew that that my protagonist, anti protagonist, Antagon at, whatever you want to call it. Antihero had to die and had to be killed by whoever was standing in firm mcduff. So I just kind of went off of that and used parts of high school that like actually happened, conversations that I could like vaguely remember, and I kind of just like stitched it all together into this narrative all building up to like Intel being announced. And obviously they were like liberties taken. We never had a hog grossed, but we definitely had like so come on the magnet. School, like it's not. It wasn't like rotten. You guys like Phillips exitter or something. I don't know, man is school in New Jersey. It was. We definitely had fancy events, but this kind...

...of based on that. And like we definitely had very uncomfortable schoolwide meetings in the auditorium that we're really weird. It just like very toned eff then we get have parties. So it's just all kind of like stuff I just stitched together. I didn't really want to be super beholden to any structure when I was making this because I felt like if I were going was going to make myself beholding to a structure I just wasn't gonna end up writing, you know. So I just kind of like went for it and like vomited it all out and just let it be as long as it needed to be until I felt like okay, it's done, and then obviously I edited and like showed it to my friends. Doesn't make sense. Also, like this one character, I think you gave them two last names by by accident. I was like, Oh yeah, and then like people are like, Oh wait, what years this sin? I was like, Oh yeah, I don't making a lot like you lave. I'm making a lot of two thousand and eighteen references when I set this play in two thousand and fourteen. So obviously stuff by the change, but that's just kind of what he did. Yeah, yeah, it's so interesting because Josh and I have been talking about adaptation like a whole bunch since we started working on a key and it's like there's this spectrum of like I'm going to like remake every scene and it's going to like fit into this like shape of what the source text is, versus like I'm going to be inspired by the shape of it, by the themes of it by like maybe some characters and not other characters, and then also layering autobiography on top of it. It's just like yeah, it like mixes it up and like makes it so interesting. Are Final and best question is so now we're about to listen to excerpts from Beth, which is gonna be really good. What do you want people to have in their brains as they listen to Beth? What do you want to private with? Hmm, I guess going in and Beth, try to remember what it was like in high school to think that every test or every like interaction you had was like the end of the world, and try to think about the young people that you have in your life who might be going through that as you listen to this play. When shallowy three meet again in thunder lightning or in rain? Why are you talking like that? Seriously, you need to stop. It's getting annoying. Oh, come on, it's kind of cool. Quoting Shakespeare is cool. God, you really are an APE nerd. Don't rag on me just because you couldn't get in. It wouldn't fit my schedule. Yeah, yeah, okay, there are two sections of IB math. You could have asked Mrs Buffoalino to transfer to woejix class. It wasn't just IB math, it was also, I be Spanish, and AP bio and a p Yeah, okay, t okay, whatever. And guys, can we do what we came here to do? Please, fine, whatever, such a goody two shoes. I don't seriously like do some drugs or something. Guys, can you help me? Uh Huh, all right, got the goods. Yep, you know it. What you said. We need a tongue of raw. God, Oh God, Oh God, this is how we get tongue of wrath. I know, I think it just looked different in my head, different in your head. Yeah, okay, you imagine us getting several tongues of rat in a way other than this, like in a wait, other than me rating the stem cell up, Pinky, AP bio, I guess I did. Wow, so fast. Yeah, the lab rats. What does Dr Peter Leezy feed them? So Anatomy? Final Intel rejecks? Who Know? So Y's so cute? All right, a girl. Let's see...

...yours. Hmmm, sir, Oh, rose, and you thought I was being dramatic. Good, this is objectively more disgusting than a bunch of pure world row. It's there will crawling over each other in love. Just drop it, just drop it, fucking disgusting. Oh come on, guys, your psychopath. You're such a goody two shoes. Not Funny. Humor is subjective. Hubbbbbb. Where to God you two have adhd. No, you're just pretentious. At least I was never an American wit one. At least I never liked catch her in the Rye. All a bunch of phonies. It's time ready, m darksome night and Shining Moon hearkened to the witch's room. Take this our offering, which we give forth, ensuring our perfect sat scores. By all the powers of land and see. Be Thou obedient unto me. Wand and Pencacle, Cup and sword. Show US WHO's destined to reap their reward through through wind and storm, through blood and strife. WHO Shall Win all in exchange for her life? But all the powers of land and sea, as we do, say so, will it be by all mind of moon and sun, as we do, will it shall be done by all the powers of friend. See, as we do, say so. Will it be by all the might of moon and Sun, and as we do, will, it shall be done by all the powers of land and see, as we do, say, so will we be by all the might and so as we do. Well, it shall be done factor you. You'll have your nodes supposed to me. You should have pulled him. Yes, I'll have my notes for me, not for you. Yes, stupid idiot. Okay, you sure have. I would have. I would have been like, Screwyah, fuck you'll. fucking fuck you, stupid, fucking fuck. I'm not as assertive as you. You should be. You could be climber Power Queen. Please come to the nurse's office. He stop what. You've been eating out of the same bag in cheerios since Rosh Hashana. So happy here. It's not healthy. You should eat like like a grain thing, like a vegetable whatever. Oh God, he's here. I can't look at why did he break up with me? Oh my God, pull yourself together. No, bitch, no, listen, pull yourself together. You're not gonna let this get to you. You're not gonna let this man degrade you. You're better than that. Or not? Yes, yes, you are, because you're bad. You've got a five point six way to you, PA. You've got a fifteen sixty s at you're enrolled in the IB program, you're taking for a peak classes, you're the president of the JSA. You're the lead dude the winter musical. Well, you're volunteering three hundred hours a week at Sloan catering a diatric wing. You know how to play piano, violin and also saxophone, and you practice for forty...

...hours a day. That's not even physically possible. Just it is, because your bet and you are bad. You are. It is a Bet Wang, the last name ever for it's name, Grettis, my last name, sounds like another word for penis. Yeah, element, you are the princess of microbiology, the Zarina Cellular Sciences, Lemon, ugly, Bat, pig. No, you are a foss ass bitch and you're gonna stop eating and drinking this crack. It's code zero, no calories. It has outpertam, which is an abjective substance. How are you going to be a winner when you're an adject you should switch hard to sparkling water like me. It's calvary and chemical free, doesn't stuck give you headaches. Yeah, but I have like a super high paint Doloran. So why don't you scare tenment. CAN'T ALLERGIC? Yeah, it's weird. Huh, we're getting distracted. The point is, you're gonna turn this all around. You'RE gonna use this to your advantage. You'RE gonna get hot and skinny and you're not gonna let that man ruin you. I'm ruined, Gonta. Let him distract to you. So distracted, don't be. You know what you're gonna do after all this. You know what you're going to do right after this lunch period INS cry. No, YOU'RE gonna MARCH OVER TO DR P's lablog on to the school database, open up your intent sub mission and you're gonna work. You're gonna work your ass off. Okay, you're gonna work your ass off and you're gonna be until finalist. You'RE gonna be a finalist. You'RE gonna get the best in category, advanced to the last round and you're gonna win. You'RE gonna be a crap prize winner, get invited to the finalists wire in DC and meet former President Barack Oh bomma. Know what Danny's gonna do? He's gonna sit there and stuff is race with more chicken cutlet sandwiches, wol woo move boats from their own man. That's right now. So'll throw that out, keep the rest of it up in the bathroom and go to Dr p's office and work. Okay, work your fucking ass off. I'M gonna work my fucking ass off. What are you gonna do? You're gonna, Oh, how Queen, you're gonna slade again. Bitch, I'm Queen. I'm a bitch, I'm a quick bitch, a fucking win. I'm a fucking win in town. Twenty Five, seventy, five thousand dollars. You see finals feet former precedent B Rock, Oh Bama, I'm gonna be former President Barack Obama, and I'm gonna body slamming. Yeah, I'M gonna, gonna muzzle rotten. Bitch. I'm gonna MASERATI and a hot body. Right, bitch, so go, I'm going. All Right, I'm done. What the Hell is your problem with? The Hell is your problem? I thought the one who just tried to murder someone? Oh my God, chill out, he was going to be fine. This is a three story window. The wrong kind of ball could kill a person. Would you relax? Women are so fucking dramatic. Oh, I'm being dramatic. Yes, you are. You tried to kill someone. What? You tried to kill your friend. Oh my God, try to kill your friend because he was helping me, helping you get off. He was comforting me, he was making me feel good. Oh Nice. Are you done flirting that now? He was making me feel good about myself, about who I am. Shut up, something you could never be bothered to do. I tried, Beth, I tried to make you feel good all the time, but you were always so sad, so so, so fucking sad. I was sad. Yes, that is what you are. You are sad, and it is so painfully obvious that your shitty attitude and stupid fucking ambition is because you are so, so, so insecure. Oh please, you're a work a holic. Oh my God, yes, yes, you're a fucking work a holic, and you...

...self sabotage every relationship you've ever had because you are totally fucking lost. When even one second of everyone else's time, it's not completely spent on you. Why should everyone else's time be spent on me? Your attention? Totalitarian? Wow, you're literally Hitler. Wow, it's always been about you, stupid fucking Intel competition. So a minute I met you. That's what you're always about, winning Intel. It was never about us. Why are you so surprised? Then? You knew that Intel was important to me. Why are you acting so surprised? Because I thought that once you realize what this was, you would change your mind. WHY WOULD I change my mind? Because this is real. But we have had is real and it's something worth investing your time, and realistically, I mean it's certainly a more realistic investment than Intel. Why is Intel not a realistic investment? Intel is the best high school science competition in the world. Winning means the best colleges, the best scholarships, the best research fellowships, the best career, the best future, the best life. What about a life with me? Is winning more important than a life with me? It's not just about the winning, you, you fucking peep, bright socio bad it is about math and sites. It is about the two most structured, tangible real that exists with a tree, falls and force. It's not because it just felt like doing it. It's because of math and science. It's because the Earth's graptational poll wrenched it into the ground. Gravity, one of the four fundamental and reactions of physics. Is An inevitable force drawing two objects closer and closer together until I collide. And gravity raised down on these trees and up ends their roots and causes structural instabilities that send them crashing into the ground. That is what you are, Danny. You are gravity. You are a structural instability, pulling me closer and closer to you until every last good part of me has been way down by your incomprehensibly heavy, vast and boundles stupidity. But gravity is also the weakest of the physical forces and I am not about to be grounded by a weak fucking force. We've developed these theories, we've developed these objectives, these stepping stones of understanding the world around us, and the steps name makes sense. You and I, Danny, we just never made sense. What am I supposed to do about that? Broke my fucking heart, Beth. He's fucking dead, fucking dead. Oh my God, so those were three scenes from Alex Linn's bath. I Love Beth. I love Beth a lot. I love a good Britney Spears reference, obviously. Oh my God, it's slade. I love that scenes so much and I just love how like really like emotionally raw and vulnerable this play is and how dangerous this play feels and how it's sort of like we were talking about in our interview with Alex, sort of personifies how intense and edgy and like life and death literally stakes, everything is in high school, and I just it's a play that I was excited to read and I wish I wrote. So what more can you say than that? Honestly? Yeah, it was. And once again we truly found this in the void, just like on new play exchange, totally randomly, and we were so excited to come on it because there are I mean, Macbeth is a very classic play. Obviously some say that it's the Best Shakespeare play. So naturally there are a bunch of adaptations, but this one was not only close to us personally because we knew Alex, but in terms of shared experience, in terms of just sort of understanding where this play is coming from and the emotions that fuel it. It was just really exciting for...

...both of us to read and also exciting to see and rehearsal into design. This was so much fun. Where else, truly, as a sound designer, do you get to design rat tails getting cut off totally, or so every sound by a pencil ten out of ten. Everybody should read this play. Yes, read and produce it and then for likes lots of money and say that we sent you there. So this was our first episode of a Kipedia. This was the highly akey pilot, acky flu. Yeah, so as we as we move forward with this project, basically what you can expect from us is some more episodes like this, where we feature excerpts from adaptations and pair them with performances of the achy scripts of said adaptation subject matter, and also we're gonna do some shorter form, more text focused, Akey episodes where we present each other with a surprise Akey and leave read them live and react to them in real time, and some other stuff too. Maybe we'll talk about musicals, because I can't stop thinking about musicals these days for some reason. Yeah, yeah, yeah, well, we hope you come back. Also, donate to Wikipedia, because they if you've ever been on Wikipedia, they probably have a please donate to us. Please preserve the neutrality of this encyclopedia online. So donate to wikipedia. Also donate to us. Yeah, we love for US artists as we love an the arts, especially when those artists and arts are living. Yes, when they're alive and they've a pulse and a twitter, they need Monty, if you are so in if you so if you are so inclined, please go to wikipediacom and fund us through paypal and support the channel and support the artists that we hope to work with in the future. So this is a Kipedia. We're poking holes and we're poking fun and in Jesus, theatrical cannon. I said it. It's my favorite breading cail. She came up with that. It's the smartest thing I've ever heard, and I've heard many smart things. I worked on mcbath. So okay, bye, bye. Mcbeth was directed by Brandy carry, written by Lauren Dureko and performed by Amara Petroso, sakl, Alex Seymour, Jasmine Thomas, Ben Barnett, Jasmine Cornelle, Brittany Lou Jillian son, Carol Jong and Phoebe Holden. Beth was written by Alex Linn, directed by Kara Hian and performed by Brittany Loup no occasion, so Elsie Das, Gillian son, Carol Jong and Phoebe Holden.

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